Table of Contents
X-Ray Optics and Instrumentation
Volume 2008, Article ID 318171, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/318171
Research Article

High Definition X-Ray Fluorescence: Principles and Techniques

X-Ray Optical Systems, Inc., 15 Tech Valley Drive, East Greenbush, NY 12061, USA

Received 28 December 2007; Accepted 10 March 2008

Academic Editor: Ladislav Pina

Copyright © 2008 Z. W. Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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