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RETRACTED
This article has been retracted as it is essentially identical in title and technical content with a published paper in Journal of Nonlinear Analysis and Optimization published in 2011. The article was submitted on the same day in two different journals; Abstract and Applied Analysis and Journal of Nonlinear Analysis and Optimization, without the knowledge of Dr. Dumitru Baleanu.
Abstract and Applied Analysis
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 219640, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/219640
Research Article

The Stability of Gauss Model Having One-Prey and Two-Predators

1Department of Mathematics, Razi University, Kermanshah 67149, Iran
2Department of Mathematics, Ilam University, Ilam 69315-516, Iran
3Department of Mathematics and Computer Sciences, Cankaya University, 06530 Ankara, Turkey
4Institute of Space Sciences, Bucharest, Magurele, Romania

Received 22 August 2011; Revised 10 November 2011; Accepted 11 November 2011

Academic Editor: Muhammad Aslam Noor

Copyright © 2012 A. Farajzadeh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The study of the dynamics of predator-prey interactions can be recognized as a major issue in mathematical biology. In the present paper, some Gauss predator-prey models in which three ecologically interacting species have been considered and the behavior of their solutions in the stability aspect have been investigated. The main aim of this paper is to consider the local and global stability properties of the equilibrium points for represented systems. Finally, stability of some examples of Gauss model with one prey and two predators is discussed.

1. Introduction

Gauss is one of the well-known scientists who studied in various area in mathematics such as mathematical biology and mathematical ecology. One of his famous models is predator-prey problem in which were obtained the fundamental results in order to be interpreted and analyzed by him. In 1934, Gauss introduced his standard model in mathematical biology. After two years, he and Smaragdov studied a generalization of the following model as a model for predator-prey interactions: (see, for more details, [1]).

More general form of this model known as an intermediate model of predator-prey interactions is as follows:

Since the predator-prey system is investigated and extended frequently, one of the more investigated extensions of predator-prey system is this model with two preys and one predator. One may see some analysis of predator-prey system having two preys and one predator in references such as [28]. Elabbasy and Lisena studied dynamics of periodic predator-prey system having two preys and one predator [2, 6]. Gakkhar and Singh investigated food web model consisting of two preys and one predator which was a harvested factor [3]. The predator-prey system with two preys and one predator consisting of effort rate harvested factor is studied in [4, 5, 7]. A dynamic behavior of the Holling-II system with two preys and one predator system and with impulsive effect concerning biological control is investigated in [8].

2. The Predator-Prey Gauss Model with One Prey and Two Predators

Let us consider a system of two predator species living in an ecosystem independently and each species baits the prey. The Gauss model with one prey and two predators may be written as follows: where is the density of prey species, and and are the densities of predators species. In this system, all of coefficients , and are positive and constant. Moreover, the prey enhances in absence of predators species and this increasing is limited by terms and . In the absence of prey, density of predators populations decrease by exponential growth rate and the prey has positive efficiency on predator population to be a positive sign; the terms and prove this claim.

For example, consider two species fox and eagle living in an ecosystem and each of the two species baits of rabbit species. In addition to assumptions of Gauss’s model, assume that and have properties of in the Gauss model (1.1).

In system (2.1), the following properties are held.(i)If the population density for one of the predators species is zero, then the system (2.1) converts to the system (1.1).(ii)If the population density of prey species is zero, then system (2.1) will be converted to system with two predator species that live in an ecosystem independently.(iii)Let the population density of two species be zero, then system (2.1) will be converted to an equation of growth rate.(iv)The solutions orbit of system (2.1) is located in the following set:

The terms and have the properties described as follows:(i), is continuous and differentiable for , ,(ii), is continuous and differentiable for , .

3. Local Stability

We use the linearisation method to study the stability of the system (2.1). By this means, we calculate the Jacobian matrix, which may be found as follows:

Now, let be the equilibrium point of system (2.1). Then

And so, if and , therefore, the system (2.1) is locally asymptotically stable at the equilibrium point .

Let Then, Therefore, Hence, the system (2.1) is locally asymptotically stable if and .

So, the following proposition is proved.

Proposition 3.1. Let and . The system (2.1) is locally asymptotically stable at its equilibrium point , whenever it exists.

4. Global Stability

In this section, we will prove the global stability of the system (2.1) by constructing a suitable Lyapunov function.

Theorem 4.1. The system (2.1) is globally asymptotically stable at equilibrium point , where , and .

Proof. Let us consider a suitable Lyapunov function where and . Obviously is a positive definite. Now take the derivative from the last Lyapunov system with respect to the time . So we have By substituting , and in the system (2.1), we obtain the said derivative as follows:
Since is an equilibrium point for system (2.1), so we can add the zero equations to as follows: and by putting and , we find out Therefore, if , and . This completes the proof.

5. Analysis of Examples

In this section, we present some examples of Gauss’s model and analyze the stability of them.

5.1. Analysis of Example 1

Consider the following system:

In the above system, all coefficients , and are positive constants. In the system (5.1), efficiency of the predator species on the preys species and also efficiency of the preys species on the predator species are linear. The points , and are equilibrium points of the system (5.1) which may be analyzed by using the Jacobian matrix. We first calculate the Jacobian matrix of system (5.1) as follows: So Thus, the origin is a saddle point for the system (5.1).

The Jacobian matrix for the above system at the equilibrium point is given by Thus, Hence, the equilibrium point is hyperbolic point for the system (5.1).

The Jacobian matrix at the equilibrium point is obtained by and so Thus, the equilibrium point is hyperbolic point for the system (5.1).

In fact, we worked out the following proposition.

Proposition 5.1. The following statements are true for the system (5.1).
The equilibrium point is a saddle point.
The equilibrium points and are hyperbolic points.

5.2. Analysis of Example 2

In the second example, we consider that there are two predator species which live in an ecosystem independently, but their food is the same, that is, one species prey that has interaction between members species whose mathematical model is as follows:

It is clear that .

Moreover, the equilibrium points of system (5.8) are given by Also, its Jacobian matrix is as follows:

Now by substituting the equilibrium point and simplifying, the Jacobian matrix becomes

The eigenvalues of the above matrix are and . Thus, the system (5.8) at equilibrium point is stable.

Also, the Jacobian matrix at the equilibrium point is given by The eigenvalues of the above matrix are and , and so the equilibrium point is a saddle point for the system (5.8).

Finally, the last equilibrium point is given by where its Jacobian matrix is as follows: and so Therefore, the system (5.8) is locally asymptotically stable at the above equilibrium point.

Therefore, we can summarize the above facts in the following proposition.

Proposition 5.2. For the system (5.8), the following statements are held.(i)It has three equilibrium points which are as follows: (ii)The said system is stable at the equilibrium point .(iii)The point is saddle point for the above system.(iv)The point is locally asymptotically stable for the said system.

6. Conclusion

By adding some inequalities, one may make the Gauss system having one prey and two predators asymptotically stable globally. Furthermore, it can be guessed that the generalization of the Gauss system with existing -preys and -predators is globally asymptotically stable provided the following statements hold.(i)The density of each prey is less than the corresponding component in related equilibrium point.(ii)The density of each predator is greater than the corresponding component in related equilibrium point. Moreover, one may determine the local stability for some particular model of the Gauss system having one prey and two predators such as (5.1) and (5.8) by using the linearisation method.

References

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