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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 195483, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/195483
Review Article

The Representative Porcine Model for Human Cardiovascular Disease

1Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Nagoya Heart Center, 461-0045 Aichi, Japan
2Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, School of Medicine, Stanford University, 300 Pasteur Drive, Falk CVRB007, Stanford, CA94305, USA

Received 17 September 2010; Accepted 13 December 2010

Academic Editor: Andrea Vecchione

Copyright © 2011 Yoriyasu Suzuki et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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