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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 720603, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/720603
Research Article

Psychological Stress Induces Temporary Masticatory Muscle Mechanical Sensitivity in Rats

Department of General Dentistry and Emergency, School of Stomatology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710032, China

Received 15 September 2010; Revised 13 December 2010; Accepted 30 December 2010

Academic Editor: Monica Fedele

Copyright © 2011 Fei Huang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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