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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 939023, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/939023
Review Article

The Animal Model of Spinal Cord Injury as an Experimental Pain Model

1Department of Anesthesiology & Intensive Care, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan
2Department of Breast Regenerative Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka 565-0871, Japan
3Department of Plastic Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka 565-0871, Japan
4Department of Pain Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka 565-0871, Japan

Received 13 September 2010; Accepted 19 December 2010

Academic Editor: Andrea Vecchione

Copyright © 2011 Aya Nakae et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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