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Child Development Research
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 343016, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/343016
Research Article

Early Years Policy

1Columbia University School of Social Work, 1255 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, NY 10027, USA
2Centre for Market and Public Organization, University of Bristol, 2 Priory Road, Bristol BS8 1TX, UK

Received 17 August 2010; Accepted 18 February 2011

Academic Editor: Mikael Heimann

Copyright © 2011 Jane Waldfogel and Elizabeth Washbrook. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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