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Education Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 309894, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/309894
Research Article

Socioscientific Decision Making in the Science Classroom: The Effect of Embedded Metacognitive Instructions on Students' Learning Outcomes

1Department for Biology Education, Faculty of Biology and Psychology, Georg-August-University Göttingen, Waldweg 26, 37073 Göttingen, Germany
2Center for Research on Education and Human Development, German Institute for International Educational Research (DIPF), Goethe-University Frankfurt, Schloßstraße 29, 60486 Frankfurt, Germany

Received 2 October 2012; Revised 23 November 2012; Accepted 29 November 2012

Academic Editor: Bracha Kramarski

Copyright © 2013 Sabina Eggert et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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