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Education Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 845694, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/845694
Research Article

Layers of Self- and Co-Regulation: Teachers Working Collaboratively to Support Adolescents' Self-Regulated Learning through Reading

1Faculty of Education, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, 2125 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4
2Faculty of Education, University of British Columbia, Okanagan, EME 3157, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, BC, Canada V1V 1V7
3Département de Psychopédagogie et d'Andragogie, Faculté des Sciences de l'Éducation, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-ville, Montréal, QC, Canada H3C 3J7

Received 22 May 2012; Revised 3 November 2012; Accepted 6 December 2012

Academic Editor: Nancy Perry

Copyright © 2013 Deborah L. Butler et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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