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International Journal of Food Science
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 238216, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/238216
Research Article

Polyphenol Bioaccessibility and Sugar Reducing Capacity of Black, Green, and White Teas

Functional Food Centre, Oxford Brookes University, Gipsy Lane, Oxford OX3 0BP, UK

Received 3 December 2012; Revised 25 February 2013; Accepted 15 March 2013

Academic Editor: Jose M. Prieto-Garcia

Copyright © 2013 Shelly Coe et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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