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Journal of Toxicology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 410143, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/410143
Research Article

An In Silico Approach for Evaluating a Fraction-Based, Risk Assessment Method for Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon Mixtures

1National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH 45268, USA
2Chemical, Biological and Environmental Center, SRC, Inc., Syracuse, NY 13212, USA
3Quantitative and Computational Toxicology Group, Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA

Received 25 August 2011; Accepted 1 November 2011

Academic Editor: Marina V. Evans

Copyright © 2012 Nina Ching Y. Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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