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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 374346, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/374346
Research Article

Modified High-Sucrose Diet-Induced Abdominally Obese and Normal-Weight Rats Developed High Plasma Free Fatty Acid and Insulin Resistance

1Division of Geriatrics, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China
2Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China
3Division of Endocrinology, The Fifth People’s Hospital of Chengdu, Chengdu 611130, China

Received 29 June 2012; Revised 31 October 2012; Accepted 26 November 2012

Academic Editor: Peter Adhihetty

Copyright © 2012 Li Cao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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