About this Journal Submit a Manuscript Table of Contents
Education Research International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 152747, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/152747
Research Article

Students' Persistence and Academic Success in a First-Year Professional Bachelor Program: The Influence of Students' Learning Strategies and Academic Motivation

1EduBROn-research group, Institute of Education and Information Sciences, University of Antwerp, 2000 Antwerp, Belgium
2REPRO-research group, Institute of Education and Information Sciences, University of Antwerp, 2000 Antwerp, Belgium

Received 7 December 2011; Revised 2 August 2012; Accepted 16 August 2012

Academic Editor: Eduardo Cascallar

Copyright © 2012 Gert Vanthournout et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. E. Schofer and J. W. Meyer, “The worldwide expansion of higher education in the twentieth century,” American Sociological Review, vol. 70, no. 6, pp. 898–920, 2005. View at Scopus
  2. H. G. Schuetze and M. Slowey, “Participation and exclusion: a comparative analysis of non-traditional students and lifelong learners in higher education,” Higher Education, vol. 44, no. 3-4, pp. 309–327, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. M. Watson, M. McSorley, C. Foxcroft, and A. Watson, “Exploring the motivation orientation and learning strategies of first year university learners,” Tertiary Education and Management, vol. 10, no. 3, pp. 193–207, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  4. S. J. Lea, D. Stephenson, and J. Troy, “Higher education students' attitudes to student-centred learning: beyond 'educational bulimia'?” Studies in Higher Education, vol. 28, no. 3, pp. 321–334, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. E. P. W. A. Jansen and M. Bruinsma, “Explaining achievement in higher education,” Educational Research and Evaluation, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 235–252, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. A. Minnaert and P. Janssen, “Success and progress in higher education: a structural model of studying,” British Journal of Educational Psychology, vol. 62, no. 2, pp. 184–192, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  7. R. Bennett, “Determinants of undergraduate student drop out rates in a university business studies department,” Journal of Further and Higher Education, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 123–141, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  8. P. Ramsden, Learning to Teach in Higher Education, Routledge, London, UK, 1992.
  9. M. Richardson, C. Abraham, and R. Bond, “Psychological correlates of university students' academic performance: a systematic review and meta-analysis,” Psychological Bulletin, vol. 138, no. 2, pp. 353–387, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  10. P. Hodkinson and M. Bloomer, “Dropping out of further education: complex causes and simplistic assumptions,” Research Papers in Education, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 117–140, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  11. A. Hofman and D. Van den Berg, “Determinants of study progress: the impact of student, curricular, and contextual factors on study progress in university education,” Higher Education in Europe, vol. 25, no. 1, pp. 93–110, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  12. P. A. Alexander, S. Graham, and K. R. Harris, “A perspective on strategy research: progress and prospects,” Educational Psychology Review, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 129–154, 1998. View at Scopus
  13. V. Tinto and P. Russo, “Coordinated studies programs: their effect on student involvement at a community college,” Community College Review, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 16–25, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  14. Å. Diseth and T. Kobbeltvedt, “A mediation analysis of achievement motives, goals, learning strategies, and academic achievement,” British Journal of Educational Psychology, vol. 80, no. 4, pp. 671–687, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. A. J. Elliot, H. A. McGregor, and S. Gable, “Achievement goals, study strategies, and exam performance: A mediational analysis,” Journal of Educational Psychology, vol. 91, no. 3, pp. 549–563, 1999. View at Scopus
  16. A. Stes, D. Gijbels, and P. Van Petegem, “Student-focused approaches to teaching in relation to context and teacher characteristics,” Higher Education, vol. 55, no. 3, pp. 255–267, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. M. Vansteenkiste, E. Sierens, B. Soenens, K. Luyckx, and W. Lens, “Motivational profiles from a self-determination perspective: the quality of motivation matters,” Journal of Educational Psychology, vol. 101, no. 3, pp. 671–688, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. K. Trigwell and M. Prosser, “Relating approaches to study and the quality of learning outcomes at the course level,” British Journal of Educational Psychology, vol. 61, no. 3, pp. 265–275, 1991. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  19. A. Zusho, P. R. Pintrich, and B. Coppola, “Skill and will: the role of motivation and cognition in the learning of college chemistry,” International Journal of Science Education, vol. 25, no. 9, pp. 1081–1094, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. J. D. Vermunt and Y. J. Vermetten, “Patterns in student learning: relationships between learning strategies, conceptions of learning, and learning orientations,” Educational Psychology Review, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 359–384, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. E. Deci and R. Ryan, Handbook of Self-Determination Research, University of Rochester University Press, Rochester, NY, USA, 2002.
  22. E. Deci and R. Ryan, “The “what” and “why” of goal pursuits: human needs and the self-determination of behavior,” Psychological Inquiry, vol. 11, no. 4, pp. 227–268, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. J. D. Vermunt, “The regulation of constructive learning processes,” British Journal of Educational Psychology, vol. 68, no. 2, pp. 149–171, 1998. View at Scopus
  24. J. D. Vermunt, “Metacognitive, cognitive and affective aspects of learning styles and strategies: a phenomenographic analysis,” Higher Education, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 25–50, 1996. View at Scopus
  25. J. Vermunt and A. Minnaert, “Dissonance in student learning patterns: when to revise theory?” Studies in Higher Education, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 49–61, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. E. A. Boyle, T. Duffy, and K. Dunleavy, “Learning styles and academic outcome: the validity and utility of Vermunt's inventory of learning styles in a British higher education setting,” British Journal of Educational Psychology, vol. 73, no. 2, pp. 267–290, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. V. Donche and P. Van Petegem, “The relationship between entry characteristics, learning style and academic achievement of college freshmen,” in Higher Education: Teaching, Internationalisation and Student Issues, M. Poulson, Ed., pp. 277–288, Nova Science Publishers, New York, NY, USA, 2011.
  28. J. D. Vermunt, “Relations between student learning patterns and personal and contextual factors and academic performance,” Higher Education, vol. 49, no. 3, pp. 205–234, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. J. J. Beishuizen and E. T. Stoutjesdijk, “Study strategies in a computer assisted study environment,” Learning and Instruction, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 281–301, 1999. View at Scopus
  30. V. V. Busato, F. J. Prins, J. J. Elshout, and C. Hamaker, “Learning styles: a cross-sectional and longitudinal study in higher education,” British Journal of Educational Psychology, vol. 68, no. 3, pp. 427–441, 1998. View at Scopus
  31. V. V. Busato, F. J. Prins, J. J. Elshout, and C. Hamaker, “Intellectual ability, learning style, personality, achievement motivation and academic success of psychology students in higher education,” Personality and Individual Differences, vol. 29, no. 6, pp. 1057–1068, 2000. View at Scopus
  32. L. Coertjens, V. Donche, and P. Van Petegem, “The impact of learning patterns on drop-out among first-year professional bachelor students,” in Proceedings of the the Bi-Annual Conference of the European Association on Learning and Instruction, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, August 2011.
  33. R. M. Ryan and E. L. Deci, “Intrinsic and extrinsic motivations: classic definitions and new directions,” Contemporary Educational Psychology, vol. 25, no. 1, pp. 54–67, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. C. P. Niemiec and R. M. Ryan, “Autonomy, competence, and relatedness in the classroom: applying self-determination theory to educational practice,” Theory and Research in Education, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 133–144, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. M. Vansteenkiste, W. Lens, and E. L. Deci, “Intrinsic versus extrinsic goal contents in self-determination theory: another look at the quality of academic motivation,” Educational Psychologist, vol. 41, no. 1, pp. 19–31, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. R. Vallerand, L. Pelletier, M. Blais, N. Brière, C. Senécal, and E. Vallières, “The academic motivation scale: a measure of intrinsic, extrinsic and amotivation in education,” Educational and Psychological Measurement, vol. 52, no. 4, pp. 1003–1017, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  37. J. Reeve, R. Ryan, E. Deci, and H. Jang, “Understanding and promoting autonomous self-regulation: a self-determination theory perspective,” in Motivation and Self-Regulated Learning: Theory, Research, and Application, D. Schunk and B. Zimmerman, Eds., pp. 223–244, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates Publishers, Mahwah, NJ, USA, 2007.
  38. S. R. Baker, “Intrinsic, extrinsic, and amotivational orientations: their role in University Adjustment, stress, well-being, and subsequent academic performance,” Current Psychology, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 189–202, 2004. View at Scopus
  39. F. Guay, C. F. Ratelle, A. Roy, and D. Litalien, “Academic self-concept, autonomous academic motivation, and academic achievement: mediating and additive effects,” Learning and Individual Differences, vol. 20, no. 6, pp. 644–653, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. M. S. Fortier, R. J. Vallerand, and F. Guay, “Academic motivation and school performance: toward a structural model,” Contemporary Educational Psychology, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 257–274, 1995. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. R. Vallerand and R. Bissonnette, “Intrinsic, extrinsic, and amotivational styles as predictors of behavior: a prospective study,” Journal of Personality, vol. 60, no. 3, pp. 599–620, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  42. R. J. Vallerand, M. S. Fortier, and F. Guay, “Self-determination and persistence in a real-life setting: toward a motivational model of high school dropout,” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, vol. 72, no. 5, pp. 1161–1176, 1997. View at Scopus
  43. P. L. Hardre and J. Reeve, “A motivational model of rural students' intentions to persist in, versus drop out of, high school,” Journal of Educational Psychology, vol. 95, no. 2, pp. 347–356, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. G. Vanthournout, V. Donche, D. Gijbels, and P. Van Petegem, “Further understanding learning in higher education: a systematic review on longitudinal research using Vermunt's learning pattern model,” in Style Differences in Cognition, Learning and Management: Theory, Research and Practice, S. Rayner and E. Cools, Eds., pp. 78–98, Routledge Studies in Management, Organizations and Society, London, UK, 2011.
  45. J. T. E. Richardson and A. Woodley, “Another look at the role of age, gender and subject as predictors of academic attainment in higher education,” Studies in Higher Education, vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 475–493, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  46. J. S. Hyde and K. C. Kling, “Women, motivation, and achievement,” Psychology of Women Quarterly, vol. 25, no. 4, pp. 364–378, 2001. View at Scopus
  47. Flemish department of Education and Training, Education in Flanders: The Flemish educational landscape in a nutshell, http://www.ond.vlaanderen.be/publicaties/?nr=120, 2008.
  48. Flemish department of Education and Training, “Arbeidsmarktrapport onderwijs, april 2008,” Report on the Labor Market in the Sector of Education, Flemish Ministry of Education, Brussels, Belgium, 2008.
  49. V. Donche, J. Vermunt, L. Coertjens, G. Vanthournout, and P. Van Petegem, “Examining the construct validity of the inventory of learning styles-short version (ILS-SV),” Learning and Individual Differences. In press.
  50. R. M. Ryan and J. P. Connell, “Perceived locus of causality and internalization: examining reasons for acting in two domains,” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, vol. 57, no. 5, pp. 749–761, 1989. View at Scopus
  51. V. Donche, P. Van Petegem, H. Van de Mosselaer, and J. Vermunt, LEMO: Een Instrument Voor Feedback over Leren en Motivatie [LEMO: An Instrument Providing Feedback on Learning and Motivation], Plantyn, Mechelen, Belgium, 2010.
  52. M. Baeten, E. Kyndt, K. Struyven, and F. Dochy, “Using student-centred learning environments to stimulate deep approaches to learning: factors encouraging or discouraging their effectiveness,” Educational Research Review, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 243–260, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  53. J. Biggs, Teaching for Quality Learning at University, SRHE & Open University Press, Buckingham, UK, 2nd edition, 2003.
  54. J. D. Vermunt and N. Verloop, “Congruence and friction between learning and teaching,” Learning and Instruction, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 257–280, 1999. View at Scopus
  55. M. Baeten, F. Dochy, and K. Struyven, “The effects of different learning environments on students’ motivation for learning and their achievement,” British Journal of Educational Psychology. In press. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar