About this Journal Submit a Manuscript Table of Contents
Education Research International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 319463, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/319463
Research Article

Writing about the Personal Utility of Learning Contents in a Learning Journal Improves Learning Motivation and Comprehension

Department of Educational Science, University of Freiburg, Rempart Straße 11, D-79098 Freiburg, Germany

Received 30 May 2012; Revised 17 September 2012; Accepted 8 November 2012

Academic Editor: Susanne Narciss

Copyright © 2012 Kristin Schmidt et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. B. J. Zimmerman, “Becoming a self-regulated learner: an overview,” Theory into Practice, vol. 41, no. 2, p. 64, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  2. OECD, Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Programme for International Student Assessment, 2012, http://www.oecd.org/pisa/aboutpisa/.
  3. A. Assor, H. Kaplan, and G. Roth, “Choice is good, but relevance is excellent: autonomy-enhancing and suppressing teacher behaviours predicting students' engagement in schoolwork,” British Journal of Educational Psychology, vol. 72, no. 2, pp. 261–278, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. J. R. Kirby and M. J. Lawson, Eds., Enhancing the Quality of Learning: Dispositions, Instruction, and Mental Structures, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, NY, USA, 2012.
  5. R. E. Mayer, “Rote versus meaningful learning,” Theory into Practice, vol. 41, no. 4, pp. 226–232, 2002. View at Scopus
  6. C. Bereiter and M. Scardamalia, “Intentional learning as a goal of instruction,” in Knowing, Learning, and Instruction: Essays in Honor of Robert Glaser, L. B. Resnick, Ed., pp. 361–392, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Hillsdale, NJ, USA, 1989.
  7. M. Nückles, S. Hübner, and A. Renkl, “Enhancing self-regulated learning by writing learning protocols,” Learning and Instruction, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 259–271, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. K. Berthold, M. Nückles, and A. Renkl, “Do learning protocols support learning strategies and outcomes? The role of cognitive and metacognitive prompts,” Learning and Instruction, vol. 17, no. 5, pp. 564–577, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. A. R. McCrindle and C. A. Christensen, “The impact of learning journals on metacognitive and cognitive processes and learning performance,” Learning and Instruction, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 167–185, 1995. View at Scopus
  10. M. Nückles, S. Hübner, and A. Renkl, “Fostering self-regulated learning by journal writing: how should instructional support be designed to promote high-quality learning?” in Enhancing the Quality of Learning: Dispositions, Instruction, and Learning Processes, J. R. Kirby and M. J. Lawson, Eds., pp. 178–200, Cambridge University Press, New York, NY USA, 2012.
  11. C. M. Reigeluth and F. S. Stein, “The elaboration theory of instruction,” in Instructional-Design Theories and Models: An Overview of Their Current Status, C. M. Reigeluth, Ed., pp. 335–382, Erlbaum, Hillsdale, NJ, USA, 1983.
  12. I. Glogger, L. Holzäpfel, R. Schwonke, M. Nückles, and A. Renkl, “Activation of learning strategies in writing learning journals the specificity of prompts matters,” Zeitschrift fur Padagogische Psychologie, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 95–104, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. S. Hübner, M. Nückles, and A. Renkl, “Writing learning journals: instructional support to overcome learning-strategy deficits,” Learning and Instruction, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 18–29, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. W. Y. Lan, “The effects of self-monitoring on students' course performance, use of learning strategies, attitude, self-judgment ability, and knowledge representation,” Journal of Experimental Education, vol. 64, no. 2, pp. 101–115, 1996. View at Scopus
  15. M. Nückles, S. Hübner, S. Dümer, and A. Renkl, “Expertise reversal effects in writing-to-learn,” Instructional Science, vol. 38, no. 3, pp. 237–258, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. A. Efklides, “Interactions of metacognition with motivation and affect in self-regulated learning: the MASRL model,” Educational Psychologist, vol. 46, no. 1, pp. 6–25, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. P. R. Pintrich, “A conceptual framework for assessing motivation and self-regulated learning in college students,” Educational Psychology Review, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 385–407, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. M. Boekaerts, “Self-regulated learning at the junction of cognition and motivation,” European Psychologist, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 100–112, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  19. P. H. Winne and A. Hadwin, “Studying as self-regulated learning,” in Metacognition in Educational Theory and Practice, D. J. Hacker, J. Dunlosky, and A. Graesser, Eds., pp. 277–304, Erlbaum, Hillsdale, NJ, USA, 1998.
  20. B. J. Zimmerman, “Attaining self-regulation: a social cognitive perspective,” in Handbook of Self-Regulation, pp. 13–39, Academic Press, San Diego, Calif, US, 2000.
  21. J. S. Eccles and A. Wigfield, “Motivational beliefs, values, and goals,” Annual Review of Psychology, vol. 53, pp. 109–132, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. A. Wigfield, J. S. Eccles, R. Roeser, and U. Schiefele, “Development of achievement motivation,” in Child and Adolescent Development: An Advanced Course, W. Damon and R. M. Lerner, Eds., pp. 933–1002, John Wiley & Sons, New Jersey, NJ, USA, 2008.
  23. R. M. Ryan and E. L. Deci, “Intrinsic and extrinsic motivations: classic definitions and new directions,” Contemporary Educational Psychology, vol. 25, no. 1, pp. 54–67, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. C. A. Wolters, “Understanding procrastination from a self-regulated learning perspective,” Journal of Educational Psychology, vol. 95, no. 1, pp. 179–187, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. C. Tabernero and R. E. Wood, “Interaction between self-efficacy and initial performance in predicting the complexity of task chosen,” Psychological Reports, vol. 105, no. 3, pp. 1167–1180, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. B. J. Zimmerman and A. Bandura, “Impact of self-regulatory influences on writing course attainment,” American Educational Research Journal, vol. 31, no. 4, pp. 845–862, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  27. T. J. Cleary and P. P. Chen, “Self-regulation, motivation, and math achievement in middle school: variations across grade level and math context,” Journal of School Psychology, vol. 47, no. 5, pp. 291–314, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. T. Bouffard-Bouchard, “Influence of self-efficacy on performance in a cognitive task,” The Journal of Social Psychology, vol. 130, pp. 353–363, 1990.
  29. L. Harlow, T. Debacker, and H. M. Crowson, “Need for closure, achievement goals, and cognitive engagement in high school students,” Journal of Educational Research, vol. 104, no. 2, pp. 110–119, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. C. O. Walker, B. A. Greene, and R. A. Mansell, “Identification with academics, intrinsic/extrinsic motivation, and self-efficacy as predictors of cognitive engagement,” Learning and Individual Differences, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 1–12, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. G. V. Caprara, R. Fida, M. Vecchione et al., “Longitudinal analysis of the role of perceived self-efficacy for self-regulated learning in academic continuance and achievement,” Journal of Educational Psychology, vol. 100, no. 3, pp. 525–534, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. G. E. McPherson and B. J. Zimmerman, “Self-regulation of musical learning: a social cognitive perspective,” in The New Handbook on Music Teaching and Learning, R. Colwell, Ed., pp. 327–347, Oxford University Press, New York, NY, USA, 2002.
  33. M. Boekaerts, “Self-regulated learning: a new concept embraced by researchers, policy makers, educators, teachers, and students,” Learning and Instruction, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 161–186, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. J. A. Ramaley and R. R. Haggett, “Engaged and engaging science: a component of a good liberal education,” Peer Review, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 8–12, 2005.
  35. E. L. Deci and R. M. Ryan, “Intrinsic motivation inventory,” 2012, http://www.selfdeterminationtheory.org/.
  36. G. Erkens, G. Kanselaar, M. Prangsma, and J. Jaspers, “Computer support for collaborative and argumentative writing,” in Powerful Learning Environments: Unravelling Basic Components and Dimensions, E. de Corte, L. Verschaffel, N. Entwistle, and J. van Merrienboer, Eds., pp. 159–177, Pergamon, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2003.
  37. J. Cohen, Statistical Power Analysis for the Behavioral Sciences, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Hillsdale, NY, USA, 2nd edition, 1988.
  38. C. M. Chiu and E. T. G. Wang, “Understanding Web-based learning continuance intention: the role of subjective task value,” Information and Management, vol. 45, no. 3, pp. 194–201, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. S. D. Tunnicliffe and C. Ueckert, “Teaching biology—the great dilemma,” Journal of Biological Education, vol. 41, no. 2, pp. 51–52, 2007. View at Scopus
  40. M. Pressley and K. R. Harris, “Cognitive strategies instruction: from basic research to classroom instruction,” in Handbook of Educational Psychology, P. A. Alexander and P. H. Winne, Eds., pp. 265–286, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates Publishers, Mahwah, NJ, USA, 2006.