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Education Research International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 396019, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/396019
Research Article

Free Education in Rwanda: Just One Step towards Reducing Gender and Sibling Inequalities

1Department of Applied Statistics, Faculty of Economics and Management, National University of Rwanda, P.O. Box 124, Butare, Rwanda
2Department of Human Geography and Urban and Regional Planning, Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS Utrecht, The Netherlands

Received 1 August 2012; Accepted 4 October 2012

Academic Editor: David Neumann

Copyright © 2012 Joseph Nkurunziza et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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