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Education Research International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 479361, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/479361
Research Article

Literacy in Limbo? Performance of Two Reading Promotion Schemes in Public Basic Schools in Ghana

Department of Publishing Studies, College of Art and Social Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), Kumasi, Ghana

Received 4 March 2012; Revised 5 July 2012; Accepted 9 July 2012

Academic Editor: Bernhard Schmidt-Hertha

Copyright © 2012 Kwasi Opoku-Amankwa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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