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Education Research International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 579590, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/579590
Research Article

Affect and Cognitive Interference: An Examination of Their Effect on Self-Regulated Learning

1Department of Early Childhood Education, School of Education, University of Ioannina, 451 10 Ioannina, Greece
2School of Psychology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 541 24 Thessaloniki, Greece

Received 3 August 2012; Revised 6 November 2012; Accepted 11 November 2012

Academic Editor: Bracha Kramarski

Copyright © 2012 Georgia Papantoniou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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