Table of Contents
Advances in Andrology
Volume 2014, Article ID 626374, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/626374
Review Article

The Enzymatic Antioxidant System of Human Spermatozoa

1The Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada H3H 2R9
2Departments of Surgery (Urology Division), McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada H3G 1A4
3Obstetrics and Gynecology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 1A1
4Pharmacology and Therapeutics, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada H3G 1Y6
5Urology Research Laboratory, Royal Victoria Hospital, Room H6.46, 687 Avenue des Pins Ouest, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 1A1

Received 25 February 2014; Accepted 19 June 2014; Published 10 July 2014

Academic Editor: Mónica Hebe Vazquez-Levin

Copyright © 2014 Cristian O’Flaherty. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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