Table of Contents
Advances in Artificial Neural Systems
Volume 2014, Article ID 318390, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/318390
Research Article

An Electronic Circuit Model of the Interpostsynaptic Functional LINK Designed to Study the Formation of Internal Sensations in the Nervous System

1Division of Neurology, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, GF532-820 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, MB, Canada R3A 1R9
2Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Room A4-08, Toronto, ON, Canada M4N 3M5

Received 5 August 2014; Accepted 12 October 2014; Published 3 December 2014

Academic Editor: Shuai Li

Copyright © 2014 Kunjumon I. Vadakkan. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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