Table of Contents
Advances in Artificial Neural Systems
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 635840, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/635840
Research Article

Application of Neural Network Modeling to Identify Auditory Processing Disorders in School-Age Children

Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849, USA

Received 29 August 2014; Revised 4 February 2015; Accepted 5 February 2015

Academic Editor: Paolo Gastaldo

Copyright © 2015 Sridhar Krishnamurti. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. American-Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), (Central) Auditory Processing Disorders—The Role of the Audiologist. [Position Statement], American-Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2005, http://www.asha.org/policy.
  2. J. Jerger and F. Musiek, “Report of the consensus conference on the diagnosis of auditory processing disorders in school-aged children,” Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, vol. 11, no. 9, pp. 467–474, 2000. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. S. Rosen, M. Cohen, and I. Vanniasegaram, “Auditory and cognitive abilities of children suspected of auditory processing disorder (APD),” International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, vol. 74, no. 6, pp. 594–600, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. A. T. Cacace and D. J. McFarland, “The importance of modality specificity in diagnosing central auditory processing disorder,” Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 112–113, 2005. View at Google Scholar
  5. A. T. Cacace and D. J. McFarland, “Factors influencing tests of auditory processing: a perspective on current issues and relevant concerns,” Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, vol. 24, no. 7, pp. 572–589, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. F. E. Musiek, T. J. Bellis, and G. D. Chermak, “Nonmodularity of the central auditory nervous system: implication for (central) auditory processing disorder,” Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 128–138, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. D. R. Moore and M. A. Ferguson, “It is neither necessary nor desirable to test for abnormalities in other modalities when diagnosing auditory processing disorder (APD),” Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, vol. 25, no. 7, pp. 695–696, 2014. View at Google Scholar
  8. J. Butcher, “Cognitive auditory responses,” in Principles and Applications in Auditory Evoked Potentials, J. T. Jacobson, Ed., Allyn & Bacon, Boston, Mass, USA, 1992. View at Google Scholar
  9. G. D. Chermak and F. E. Musiek, Central Auditory Processing Disorders: New Perspectives, Singular, San Diego, Calif, USA, 1997.
  10. F. E. Musiek, “Habilitation and management of auditory processing disorders,” Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, vol. 10, pp. 329–342, 1999. View at Google Scholar
  11. F. E. Musiek and S. Bornstein, “Auditory event-related potentials in central auditory disorders in young children,” in Central Auditory Processing: A Transdisciplinary View, J. Katz, N. A. Stecker, and D. Henderson, Eds., Mosby, St. Louis, Mo, USA, 1994. View at Google Scholar
  12. J. Polich, L. Howard, and A. Starr, “P300 latency correlates with digit span,” Psychophysiology, vol. 20, no. 6, pp. 665–669, 1983. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. J. Polich, “Attention, probability, and task demands as determinants of P300 latency from auditory stimuli,” Electroencephalography & Clinical Neurophysiology, vol. 63, no. 3, pp. 251–259, 1986. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. D. L. McPherson and M. T. Salamat, “Interactions among variables in the P300 response to a continuous performance task in normal and ADHD adults,” Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, vol. 15, no. 10, pp. 666–677, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. J. W. Hall, Handbook of Auditory Evoked Responses, Allyn & Bacon, Boston, Mass, USA, 1992.
  16. F. E. Musiek, R. Froke, and J. Weihing, “The auditory P300 at or near threshold,” Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, vol. 16, no. 9, pp. 699–708, 2005. View at Google Scholar
  17. J. Polich, “Habituation of P300 from auditory stimuli,” Psychobiology, vol. 17, pp. 19–28, 1989. View at Google Scholar
  18. J. Polich, P. C. Ellerson, and J. Cohen, “P300, stimulus intensity, modality, and probability,” International Journal of Psychophysiology, vol. 23, no. 1-2, pp. 55–62, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. W. T. Roth, G. H. Blowers, C. M. Doyle, and B. S. Kopell, “Auditory stimulus intensity effects on components of the late positive complex,” Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology, vol. 54, no. 2, pp. 132–146, 1982. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. E. Donchin, “Surprise!...Surprise?” Psychophysiology, vol. 18, no. 5, pp. 493–513, 1981. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. J. Polich, “Updating P300: an integrative theory of P3a and P3b,” Clinical Neurophysiology, vol. 118, no. 10, pp. 2128–2148, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. J. S. Buchwald, “Comparison of plasticity in sensory and cognitive processing systems,” Clinics in Perinatology, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 57–66, 1990. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. D. McPherson, Late Potentials of the Auditory System, Singular, San Diego, Calif, USA, 1996.
  24. J. W. Tampas, A. W. Harkrider, and M. S. Hedrick, “Neurophysiological indices of speech and nonspeech stimulus processing,” Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, vol. 48, no. 5, pp. 1147–1164, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. D. C. Emanuel, “The auditory processing battery: survey of common practices,” Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 93–117, 2002. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. C. C. Duncan-Johnson and E. Donchin, “The time constant in P300 recording,” Psychophysiology, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 53–55, 1979. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. R. E. Jirsa and K. B. Clontz, “Long latency auditory event-related potentials from children with auditory processing disorders,” Ear and Hearing, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 222–232, 1990. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. S. Krishnamurti, “P300 auditory event-related potentials in binaural and competing conditions in adults with central auditory processing disorders,” Contemporary Issues in Communication Sciences Disorders, vol. 28, pp. 40–47, 2001. View at Google Scholar
  29. F. E. Musiek, J. A. Baran, and M. L. Pinheiro, “P300 results in patients with lesions of the auditory areas of the cerebrum,” Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 5–15, 1992. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. R. Johnson Jr., “The amplitude of the P300 component of the event-related potential: review and synthesis,” in Advances in Psychophysiology, P. K. Ackles, J. R. Jennings, and M. G. H. Coles, Eds., vol. 3, pp. 69–137, Jai Press, Greenwich, Conn, USA, 1988. View at Google Scholar
  31. J. Polich, “P300, probability, and interstimulus interval,” Psychophysiology, vol. 27, no. 4, pp. 396–403, 1990. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. R. E. Jirsa, “The clinical utility of the P3AERP in children with auditory processing disorders,” Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, vol. 35, no. 4, pp. 903–912, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. S. Krishnamurti, “Monaural low redundancy speech tests,” in Handbook of Central Auditory Processing Disorders, F. E. Musiek and G. D. Chermak, Eds., Plural, San Diego, Calif, USA, 2007. View at Google Scholar
  34. S. Krishnamurti, “Pathways: Role of P300 auditory event-related potentials in evaluating auditory processing disorders,” The Hearing Journal, vol. 58, no. 7, article 49, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. H. Abdi, “Neural networks,” in Encyclopedia of Social Sciences Research Methods, Sage, Thousand Oaks, Calif, USA, 2003. View at Google Scholar
  36. R. C. Gismondi, R. M. V. R. Almeida, and A. F. C. Infantosi, “Artificial neural networks for infant mortality modelling,” Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine, vol. 69, no. 3, pp. 237–247, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. Y.-C. Li, L. Liu, W.-T. Chiu, and W.-S. Jian, “Neural network modeling for surgical decisions on traumatic brain injury patients,” International Journal of Medical Informatics, vol. 57, no. 1, pp. 1–9, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. S. Yamamura, “Clinical application of artificial neural network (ANN) modeling to predict pharmacokinetic parameters of severely ill patients,” Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews, vol. 55, no. 9, pp. 1233–1251, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. S. Krishnamurti, L. Drake, and J. King, “Neural network modeling of central auditory dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease,” Neural Networks, vol. 24, no. 6, pp. 646–651, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. A. Keshavarzi and F. Sarmadian, “Comparison of artificial neural network and multivariate regression methods in prediction of soil cation exchange capacity,” International Journal of Environmental and Earth Sciences, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 167–174, 2010. View at Google Scholar
  41. American National Standards Institute, “American national standard criteria for specifications for audiometers,” Tech. Rep. S3.6-1996, ANSI, New York, NY, USA, 1996. View at Google Scholar
  42. American National Standards Institute, “Maximum permissible ambient noise for audiometric test rooms,” ANSI S3.1-1999, ANSI, New York, NY, USA, 1999. View at Google Scholar
  43. L. Fisher, Fisher's Auditory Problems Checklist, Grant Wood, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, USA, 1980.
  44. R. W. Keith, SCAN: A Test for Auditory Processing Disorders in Children, The Psychological Corporation, San Antonio, Tex, USA, 1986.
  45. R. W. Keith, SCAN-A: A Test for Auditory Processing Disorders in Adolescents and Adults, The Psychological Corporation, San Antonio, Tex, USA, 1992.
  46. R. L. Schow and G. D. Chermak, “Implications from factor analysis for central auditory processing disorders,” American Journal of Audiology, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 137–142, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  47. D. M. Domitz and R. L. Schow, “A new CAPD battery—multiple auditory processing assessment: factor analysis and comparisons with SCAN,” American Journal of Audiology, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 101–111, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  48. M. Pinheiro, “Tests of central auditory function for children with learning disabilities,” in Central Auditory Dysfunction, R. W. Keith, Ed., pp. 223–256, Grune & Stratton, New York, NY, USA, 1977. View at Google Scholar
  49. F. E. Musiek, “Frequency (pitch) and duration pattern tests,” Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, vol. 5, no. 4, pp. 265–268, 1994. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  50. F. E. Musiek and M. L. Pinheiro, “Frequency patterns in cochlear, brainstem, and cerebral lesions,” Audiology, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 79–88, 1987. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  51. F. E. Musiek, J. A. Baran, and M. L. Pinheiro, “Duration pattern recognition in normal subjects and patients with cerebral and cochlear lesions,” Audiology, vol. 29, no. 6, pp. 304–313, 1990. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  52. T. J. Bellis, Assessment and Management of Central Auditory Processing Disorders: From Science to Practice, Thompson-Delmar Learning, 2nd edition, 2003.
  53. L. G. Wall, S. A. Davidson, and S. D. Dalebout, “Determining latency and amplitude for multiple peaked P300 waveforms,” Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 189–194, 1991. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  54. S. D. Dalebout and R. R. Robey, “Comparison of the intersubject and intrasubject variability of exogenous and endogenous auditory evoked potentials,” Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, vol. 8, no. 5, pp. 342–354, 1997. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  55. G. Dawson, C. Finley, S. Phillips, and A. Lewy, “A comparison of hemispheric asymmetries in speech-related brain potentials of autistic and dysphasic children,” Brain and Language, vol. 37, no. 1, pp. 26–41, 1989. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  56. J. Polich, J. E. Alexander, L. O. Bauer et al., “P300 topography of amplitude/latency correlations,” Brain Topography, vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 275–282, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  57. D. E. Rumelhart, J. L. McClelland, and The PDP Research Group, Parallel Distributed Processing: Explorations in the Microstructure of Cognition, vol. 1: Foundations, MIT Press, Cambridge, Mass, USA, 1986.
  58. B. Widrow and M. A. Lehr, “30 years of adaptive neural networks: perceptron, madaline, and backpropagation,” Proceedings of the IEEE, vol. 78, no. 9, pp. 1415–1442, 1990. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  59. R. Johnson Jr., “A triarchic model of P300 amplitude,” Psychophysiology, vol. 23, no. 4, pp. 367–384, 1986. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  60. R. Johnson Jr., “On the neural generators of the P300 component of the event-related potential,” Psychophysiology, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 90–97, 1993. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  61. R. Kilpeläinen, A. Koistinen, M. Könönen, E. Herrgård, J. Partanen, and J. Karhu, “P300 sequence effects differ between children and adults for auditory stimuli,” Psychophysiology, vol. 36, no. 3, pp. 343–350, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  62. M. T. Salamat and D. L. McPherson, “Interactions among variables in the P300 response to a continuous performance task,” Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, vol. 10, no. 7, pp. 379–387, 1999. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  63. J. M. Stapleton, T. O'Reilly, and E. Halgren, “Endogenous potentials evoked in simple cognitive tasks: scalp topography,” International Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 36, no. 1-2, pp. 75–87, 1987. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  64. S. Sutton, M. Braren, and J. Zubin, “Evoked-potential correlates of stimulus uncertainty,” Science, vol. 150, no. 3700, pp. 1187–1188, 1965. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  65. S. Sutton, P. Tueting, J. Zubin, and E. R. John, “Information delivery and the sensory evoked potential,” Science, vol. 155, no. 3768, pp. 1436–1439, 1967. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  66. N. M. Russo, T. G. Nicol, S. G. Zecker, E. A. Hayes, and N. Kraus, “Auditory training improves neural timing in the human brainstem,” Behavioural Brain Research, vol. 156, no. 1, pp. 95–103, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  67. S. Krishnamurti, J. Forrester, C. Rutledge, and G. W. Holmes, “A case study of the changes in the speech-evoked auditory brainstem response associated with auditory training in children with auditory processing disorders,” International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, vol. 77, no. 4, pp. 594–604, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus