Table of Contents
Advances in Biology
Volume 2014, Article ID 181353, 29 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/181353
Review Article

Evolutionary History of Terrestrial Pathogens and Endoparasites as Revealed in Fossils and Subfossils

Department of Integrated Biology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA

Received 9 February 2014; Revised 29 April 2014; Accepted 2 May 2014; Published 12 June 2014

Academic Editor: Renfu Shao

Copyright © 2014 George Poinar Jr. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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