Table of Contents
Advances in Biology
Volume 2014, Article ID 274196, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/274196
Review Article

Cross Talk between Cellular Regulatory Networks Mediated by Shared Proteins

Institute of Cell Biology, University of Bern, Baltzerstraße 4, 3012 Bern, Switzerland

Received 4 March 2014; Accepted 2 June 2014; Published 25 June 2014

Academic Editor: Qianzheng Zhu

Copyright © 2014 Christine Dolde et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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