Table of Contents
Advances in Biology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 523591, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/523591
Review Article

Function, Structure, and Evolution of the Major Facilitator Superfamily: The LacY Manifesto

Department of Physiology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA

Received 5 June 2014; Accepted 7 August 2014; Published 18 September 2014

Academic Editor: Luis Loura

Copyright © 2014 M. Gregor Madej. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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