Table of Contents
Advances in Biology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 582749, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/582749
Review Article

Role of Orphan Nuclear Receptor DAX-1/NR0B1 in Development, Physiology, and Disease

Enzo Lalli1,2,3

1Institut de Pharmacologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire CNRS, 660 route des Lucioles, Sophia Antipolis, 06560 Valbonne, France
2Associated International Laboratory (LIA) NEOGENEX CNRS, 06560 Valbonne, France
3University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, 06560 Valbonne, France

Received 8 December 2013; Accepted 25 March 2014; Published 20 May 2014

Academic Editor: Bo Zuo

Copyright © 2014 Enzo Lalli. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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