Table of Contents
Advances in Biology
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 890632, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/890632
Research Article

Role of Green Tea in Reducing Epidermal Thickness upon Ultraviolet Light-B Injury in BALB/c Mice

1Department of Anatomy and Histopathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Sulaimani University, Sulaimani 46, Iraq
2Department of Anatomy and Histology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Basrah University, Basrah 61, Iraq

Received 12 July 2015; Revised 3 September 2015; Accepted 7 September 2015

Academic Editor: Qianzheng Zhu

Copyright © 2015 Snur M. A. Hassan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The main environmental source for skin damage is ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Many adverse effects have been recognized as the result of prolonged cutaneous exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation, such as erythema, edema, apoptosis, hyperplastic responses, photo-aging, and skin cancer development. Green tea provides photo-protection against UV radiation through many mechanisms including anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, and antioxidant properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of green tea in reducing epidermal thickness on mouse’s skin exposed to UVB irradiation. Thirty mice (Mus musculus species, BALB/c strain) underwent this study and were divided into 3 groups: control group ( mice), without UVB exposure and green tea administration; exposure group ( mice), which were exposed to UVB light only; and treatment group ( mice), which were exposed to UVB light and treated with 1 mL of green tea through oral gavage. Mice from both groups (exposure and treatment) were subjected to UVB irradiation 4 days/week (20 minutes/day, 4 weeks). It concluded that oral administration of green tea was provided photo-protection against UVB induced hyperplasia; therefore, it can be regarded as a natural alternative for photo-protection.