Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Advances in Bioinformatics
Volume 2011, Article ID 124062, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/124062
Review Article

Inferring Biological Mechanisms by Data-Based Mathematical Modelling: Compartment-Specific Gene Activation during Sporulation in Bacillus subtilis as a Test Case

Department for Biosystems Science and Engineering, Switzerland and Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB), ETH Zurich, Mattenstraße 26, Basel 4058, Switzerland

Received 1 September 2011; Revised 12 October 2011; Accepted 3 November 2011

Academic Editor: Allegra Via

Copyright © 2011 Dagmar Iber. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Biological functionality arises from the complex interactions of simple components. Emerging behaviour is difficult to recognize with verbal models alone, and mathematical approaches are important. Even few interacting components can give rise to a wide range of different responses, that is, sustained, transient, oscillatory, switch-like responses, depending on the values of the model parameters. A quantitative comparison of model predictions and experiments is therefore important to distinguish between competing hypotheses and to judge whether a certain regulatory behaviour is at all possible and plausible given the observed type and strengths of interactions and the speed of reactions. Here I will review a detailed model for the transcription factor 𝜎 𝐹 , a regulator of cell differentiation during sporulation in Bacillus subtilis. I will focus in particular on the type of conclusions that can be drawn from detailed, carefully validated models of biological signaling networks. For most systems, such detailed experimental information is currently not available, but accumulating biochemical data through technical advances are likely to enable the detailed modelling of an increasing number of pathways. A major challenge will be the linking of such detailed models and their integration into a multiscale framework to enable their analysis in a larger biological context.