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Advances in Bioinformatics
Volume 2011, Article ID 124062, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/124062
Review Article

Inferring Biological Mechanisms by Data-Based Mathematical Modelling: Compartment-Specific Gene Activation during Sporulation in Bacillus subtilis as a Test Case

Department for Biosystems Science and Engineering, Switzerland and Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB), ETH Zurich, Mattenstraße 26, Basel 4058, Switzerland

Received 1 September 2011; Revised 12 October 2011; Accepted 3 November 2011

Academic Editor: Allegra Via

Copyright © 2011 Dagmar Iber. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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