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Advances in Bioinformatics
Volume 2016, Article ID 2632917, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2632917
Research Article

Bioinformatics Approach for Prediction of Functional Coding/Noncoding Simple Polymorphisms (SNPs/Indels) in Human BRAF Gene

1Faculty of Medical Laboratory Sciences, University of Medical Science and Technology, Khartoum, Sudan
2Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Applied and Industrial Science, University of Juba, Khartoum, Sudan
3Faculty of Pharmacy, Omdurman Islamic University, Khartoum, Sudan
4Faculty of Science, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan
5Faculty of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Karary University, Khartoum, Sudan
6Tropical Medicine Research Institute, Khartoum, Sudan

Received 26 November 2015; Revised 10 May 2016; Accepted 12 May 2016

Academic Editor: Ming Chen

Copyright © 2016 Mohamed M. Hassan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

This study was carried out for Homo sapiens single variation (SNPs/Indels) in BRAF gene through coding/non-coding regions. Variants data was obtained from database of SNP even last update of November, 2015. Many bioinformatics tools were used to identify functional SNPs and indels in proteins functions, structures and expressions. Results shown, for coding polymorphisms, 111 SNPs predicted as highly damaging and six other were less. For UTRs, showed five SNPs and one indel were altered in micro RNAs binding sites (3′ UTR), furthermore nil SNP or indel have functional altered in transcription factor binding sites (5′ UTR). In addition for 5′/3′ splice sites, analysis showed that one SNP within 5′ splice site and one Indel in 3′ splice site showed potential alteration of splicing. In conclude these previous functional identified SNPs and indels could lead to gene alteration, which may be directly or indirectly contribute to the occurrence of many diseases.