Table of Contents
Advances in Ecology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 286949, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/286949
Research Article

Leopard Panthera pardus fusca Density in the Seasonally Dry, Subtropical Forest in the Bhabhar of Terai Arc, Nepal

1Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia, VA 24061, USA
2Eastern Himalayas Program (WWF-US), C/O WWF-Canada, 245 Eglinton Avenue E, Toronto, ON, Canada M4P 3J1
3Nepal Engineering College-Center for Post Graduate Studies, Kathmandu 44600, Nepal
4WWF Nepal, Kathmandu 44600, Nepal
5National Trust for Nature Conservation, Lalitpur 44700, Nepal
6Department of National Park and Wildlife Conservation, Kathmandu 44600, Nepal

Received 14 April 2014; Revised 9 June 2014; Accepted 12 June 2014; Published 16 July 2014

Academic Editor: Tomasz S. Osiejuk

Copyright © 2014 Kanchan Thapa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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