Table of Contents
Advances in Ecology
Volume 2014, Article ID 456904, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/456904
Review Article

Experiments Are Revealing a Foundation Species: A Case Study of Eastern Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis)

Harvard Forest, Harvard University, 324 North Main Street, Petersham, MA 01366, USA

Received 27 April 2014; Accepted 28 June 2014; Published 17 July 2014

Academic Editor: Alistair Bishop

Copyright © 2014 Aaron M. Ellison. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Foundation species are species that create and define particular ecosystems; control in large measure the distribution and abundance of associated flora and fauna; and modulate core ecosystem processes, such as energy flux and biogeochemical cycles. However, whether a particular species plays a foundational role in a system is not simply asserted. Rather, it is a hypothesis to be tested, and such tests are best done with large-scale, long-term manipulative experiments. The utility of such experiments is illustrated through a review of the Harvard Forest Hemlock Removal Experiment (HF-HeRE), a multidecadal, multihectare experiment designed to test the foundational role of eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis, in eastern North American forests. Experimental removal of T. canadensis has revealed that after 10 years, this species has pronounced, long-term effects on associated flora and fauna, but shorter-term effects on energy flux and nutrient cycles. We hypothesize that on century-long scales, slower changes in soil microbial associates will further alter ecosystem processes in T. canadensis stands. HF-HeRE may indeed continue for >100 years, but at such time scales, episodic disturbances and changes in regional climate and land cover can be expected to interact in novel ways with these forests and their foundation species.