Table of Contents
Advances in Emergency Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 904807, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/904807
Research Article

Mathematical Modeling of the Impact of Hospital Occupancy: When Do Dwindling Hospital Beds Cause ED Gridlock?

University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and Hillcrest Medical Center, Tulsa, OK 74135, USA

Received 24 April 2014; Revised 25 June 2014; Accepted 25 June 2014; Published 15 July 2014

Academic Editor: Angelo P. Giardino

Copyright © 2014 Lori Whelan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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