Table of Contents
Advances in Epidemiology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 323189, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/323189
Research Article

Paternal Occupational Exposure to Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals as a Risk Factor for Leukaemia in Children: A Case-Control Study from the North of England

1Institute of Health & Society, Newcastle University, Sir James Spence Institute, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 4LP, UK
2Departments of Medicine and Paediatrics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada

Received 23 April 2014; Accepted 8 July 2014; Published 16 July 2014

Academic Editor: Peter N. Lee

Copyright © 2014 Mark S. Pearce et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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