Table of Contents
Advances in Epidemiology
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 121806, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/121806
Research Article

Trajectories of Body Mass Index from Young Adulthood to Middle Age among Canadian Men and Women

1Division of Community Health & Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL, Canada A1B 3V6
2Discipline of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL, Canada A1B 3V6

Received 20 August 2015; Revised 24 October 2015; Accepted 30 November 2015

Academic Editor: Jeanine M. Buchanich

Copyright © 2015 Meng Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Knowledge regarding the heterogeneity of BMI trajectories is limited for the Canadian population. Using latent class growth modelling, four distinct BMI trajectories of individuals from young adulthood to middle age were identified for both women and men from the longitudinal data of the National Population Health Survey. The associations between BMI trajectories and the individuals’ sociodemographic characteristics and behavioural factors were also examined. Aboriginal women were found more likely to be in the long-term overweight or obese groups. It reveals that increased years of smoking, drinking, and being physically active were associated with lowering the BMI trajectory in all groups for both women and men, with some exceptions in the long-term normal weight group for men. Increased years of rural living, being employed, and living with low income were associated with raising the BMI trajectory in all groups for women and in some groups for men. Food insecurity was associated with raising the BMI trajectory in each group for both women and men.