Table of Contents
Advances in Epidemiology
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 487876, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/487876
Research Article

Using the Negative Exponential Model to Describe Changes in Risk of Smoking-Related Diseases following Changes in Exposure to Tobacco

P N Lee Statistics and Computing Ltd., 17 Cedar Road, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5DA, UK

Received 13 April 2015; Accepted 13 July 2015

Academic Editor: Jeanine M. Buchanich

Copyright © 2015 Peter N. Lee et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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