Table of Contents
Advances in Geology
Volume 2015, Article ID 968573, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/968573
Research Article

Paleocurrents, Paleohydraulics, and Palaegeography of Miocene-Pliocene Siwalik Foreland Basin of India

1Directorate of Geology & Mining UP, Khanij Bhavan, Lucknow 226001, India
2Department of Geology, Shri JNPG College, Lucknow 226001, India

Received 1 August 2014; Revised 1 December 2014; Accepted 3 December 2014

Academic Editor: Okan Tuysuz

Copyright © 2015 Zahid A. Khan and Ram Chandra Tewari. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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