SRX Agriculture

SRX Agriculture / 2010 / Article

Research Article | Open Access

Volume 2010 |Article ID 868723 | https://doi.org/10.3814/2010/868723

William T. Molin, Josie A. Hugie, "Effects of Population Density and Nitrogen Rate in Ultra Narrow Row Cotton", SRX Agriculture, vol. 2010, Article ID 868723, 6 pages, 2010. https://doi.org/10.3814/2010/868723

Effects of Population Density and Nitrogen Rate in Ultra Narrow Row Cotton

Received30 Jul 2009
Accepted02 Sep 2009
Published08 Oct 2009

Abstract

A field study was conducted to investigate the effects of population density and nitrogen rate on yield, growth, and fiber response of ultra narrow row (UNR) cotton. Stand loss occurred at densities greater than 22 plants m2 and nitrogen rates greater than 56 kg ha1 and stand loss exceeded 20% at harvest. Seed cotton yields were similar across populations and rates of 56, 112, and 168 kg ha1. Nitrogen rates greater than 56 kg ha1 resulted in greater vegetative growth based on increased plant height and number of nodes. These results indicate that populations of 22 plants m2 and nitrogen rates of 56 kg ha1 were sufficient for maximum yields in UNR cotton under our conditions. However, at higher nitrogen rates, boll formation increased at lower nodes with no corresponding change in yield. Higher nitrogen rates may promote earliness and distribute yield across more fruiting sites.

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Copyright © 2010 William T. Molin and Josie A. Hugie. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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