Table of Contents
Asian Journal of Neuroscience
Volume 2014, Article ID 891653, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/891653
Research Article

Polymorphisms in the Sortilin-Related Receptor 1 Gene Are Associated with Cognitive Impairment in Filipinos

1Research and Biotechnology, St. Luke’s Medical Center, 279 E Rodriguez Sr. Boulevard, 1112 Quezon City, Philippines
2St. Luke’s College of Medicine William H. Quasha Memorial, E Rodriquez Sr. Boulevard, 1112 Quezon City, Philippines
3Memory Center, Institute for Neuroscience, St. Luke’s Medical Center, 279 E Rodriquez Sr. Boulevard, 1112 Quezon City, Philippines

Received 6 August 2014; Revised 23 October 2014; Accepted 6 November 2014; Published 27 November 2014

Academic Editor: Raymond Chuen-Chung Chang

Copyright © 2014 Cristine R. Casingal et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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