Table of Contents
Advances in Nephrology
Volume 2014, Article ID 573685, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/573685
Review Article

Peritoneal Membrane Injury and Peritoneal Dialysis

Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Division of Nephrology, St. Joseph’s Hospital, 50 Charlton Avenue E, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8P 4A6

Received 6 July 2014; Revised 24 September 2014; Accepted 29 September 2014; Published 2 November 2014

Academic Editor: Lawrence H. Lash

Copyright © 2014 Shaan Chugh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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