Table of Contents
Advances in Neuroscience
Volume 2014, Article ID 209875, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/209875
Review Article

Synthetic Cathinones and Their Rewarding and Reinforcing Effects in Rodents

Department of Psychology, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 871104, Tempe, AZ 85287-1104, USA

Received 12 March 2014; Accepted 16 May 2014; Published 4 June 2014

Academic Editor: Eduardo Puelles

Copyright © 2014 Lucas R. Watterson and M. Foster Olive. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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