Table of Contents
Advances in Neuroscience
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 573862, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/573862
Review Article

Treatments for Neurological Gait and Balance Disturbance: The Use of Noninvasive Electrical Brain Stimulation

Division of Brain Sciences, Imperial College London, Charing Cross Hospital, London W6 8RF, UK

Received 11 June 2014; Revised 13 October 2014; Accepted 23 October 2014; Published 3 December 2014

Academic Editor: Paul Sauseng

Copyright © 2014 Diego Kaski and Adolfo M. Bronstein. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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