Table of Contents
Advances in Neuroscience
Volume 2014, Article ID 597395, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/597395
Review Article

Reelin in the Years: Controlling Neuronal Migration and Maturation in the Mammalian Brain

Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA

Received 18 August 2013; Accepted 15 October 2013; Published 5 January 2014

Academic Editor: Abdallah Hayar

Copyright © 2014 Gabriella D'Arcangelo. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

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