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Advances in Neuroscience
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 768313, 28 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/768313
Review Article

How Basal Ganglia Outputs Generate Behavior

Department of Psychology and Neuroscience and Department of Neurobiology, Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, P.O. Box 91050, Durham, NC 27708, USA

Received 10 June 2014; Revised 25 August 2014; Accepted 10 October 2014; Published 18 November 2014

Academic Editor: Xiang-Ping Chu

Copyright © 2014 Henry H. Yin. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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