Table of Contents
Advances in Orthopedic Surgery
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 761967, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/761967
Research Article

The Biological Effects of Combining Metals in a Posterior Spinal Implant: In Vivo Model Development Report of the First Two Cases

1Division of Orthopedics, Rady Children’s Hospital-San Diego, 3020 Children’s Way, MC 5054, San Diego, CA 92123, USA
2Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA 92103, USA
3Department of Pathology, Rady Children’s Hospital San Diego, San Diego, CA 92123, USA
4Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonbuk 561-712, Republic of Korea
5San Diego Center for Spinal Disorders, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA

Received 17 September 2013; Revised 8 January 2014; Accepted 11 January 2014; Published 26 February 2014

Academic Editor: Federico Canavese

Copyright © 2014 Christine L. Farnsworth et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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