Table of Contents
Advances in Optical Technologies
Volume 2011, Article ID 213783, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/213783
Review Article

Raman Spectroscopy for Clinical Oncology

1Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Particle Science and Technology Building, 205 Center Drive, P.O. Box 116595, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
2Particle Engineering Research Center, University of Florida, Particle Science and Technology Building, 205 Center Drive, P.O. Box 116595, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
3Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, University of Florida, 303 Weil Hall, P.O. Box 116595, Gainesville, FL 32611-6595, USA
4Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA
5Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, University of Florida, P.O. Box 100286, Shands Hospital, 1600 Archer Road, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA
6Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
7McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, 303 Weil Hall, P.O. Box 116595, Gainesville, FL 32611-6595, USA
8Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, 100 Rhines Hall, P.O. Box 116400, Gainesville, FL 32611-6400, USA

Received 31 May 2011; Revised 9 August 2011; Accepted 11 August 2011

Academic Editor: Ci-Ling Pan

Copyright © 2011 Michael B. Fenn et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Cancer is one of the leading causes of death throughout the world. Advancements in early and improved diagnosis could help prevent a significant number of these deaths. Raman spectroscopy is a vibrational spectroscopic technique which has received considerable attention recently with regards to applications in clinical oncology. Raman spectroscopy has the potential not only to improve diagnosis of cancer but also to advance the treatment of cancer. A number of studies have investigated Raman spectroscopy for its potential to improve diagnosis and treatment of a wide variety of cancers. In this paper the most recent advances in dispersive Raman spectroscopy, which have demonstrated promising leads to real world application for clinical oncology are reviewed. The application of Raman spectroscopy to breast, brain, skin, cervical, gastrointestinal, oral, and lung cancers is reviewed as well as a special focus on the data analysis techniques, which have been employed in the studies.