Table of Contents
Advances in Pharmaceutics
Volume 2014, Article ID 894610, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/894610
Research Article

Prophylactic Effects of Ethanolic Extract of Irvingia gabonensis Stem Bark against Cadmium-Induced Toxicity in Albino Rats

1Department of Chemical Sciences, Biochemistry Unit, Afe Babalola University, Ado-Ekiti, PMB 5454, Ekiti State, Nigeria
2Department of Biochemistry, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria

Received 28 April 2014; Accepted 19 August 2014; Published 1 September 2014

Academic Editor: Hérida Salgado

Copyright © 2014 Oluwafemi Adeleke Ojo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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