Table of Contents
Advances in Psychiatry
Volume 2014, Article ID 241075, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/241075
Research Article

Missing Motherhood: Jordanian Women's Experiences with Infertility

1Maternal Child Health Nursing Department, Princess Muna College of Nursing, Mutah University, Amman, Jordan
2Jordan University, Amman, Jordan
3Brigham Young University College of Nursing, Provo, UT 84602, USA

Received 10 January 2014; Revised 16 April 2014; Accepted 30 April 2014; Published 4 June 2014

Academic Editor: Takahiro Nemoto

Copyright © 2014 Hala Mahmoud Obeidat et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Aim, Background, and Introduction. Bearing and rearing children are an important part of life in nearly all cultures and are a central role for Jordanian Muslim women. Infertility can create anxiety, stress, and depression for couples who are infertile. Women frequently bear the emotional stigma of a couple’s infertility. There is a paucity of literature focusing on Jordanian Muslim women experiencing infertility and failed assistive reproductive technology. Therefore, this study explored these women’s lived experience. Methods. Qualitative data were collected through interviews with 30 Jordanian Muslim women who experienced failed assistive reproductive technology for infertility. Perceptions of experiences with failed treatment of infertility were documented and analyzed. Results. Major themes were identified: missing out on motherhood and living with infertility, experiencing marital stressors, feeling social pressure, experiencing depression and disappointment, having treatment associated difficulties, appreciating support from family and friends, using coping strategies, and fear of an unknown future. Discussion, Conclusion, and Implications for Clinical Practice. Being infertile significantly influences the physical, emotional, social, and spiritual health of Jordanian Muslim women as well as their quality of life. Perceived social support and personal coping strategies were used by study participants to mediate failed attempts to conceive. Designing and implementing culturally appropriate interventions for Muslim women globally who are experiencing infertility are essential.