Table of Contents
Advances in Psychiatry
Volume 2014, Article ID 529562, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/529562
Review Article

Pharmacological Prevention of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Systematic Review

1Department of Psychiatry, Disaster Management Committee, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Puducherry 605 006, India
2Department of Psychiatry, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Puducherry 605 006, India

Received 26 July 2014; Accepted 26 September 2014; Published 12 October 2014

Academic Editor: Takahiro Nemoto

Copyright © 2014 Ravi Philip Rajkumar and Balaji Bharadwaj. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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