Table of Contents
Advances in Psychiatry
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 561452, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/561452
Review Article

Limitations of Randomized Control Designs in Psychotherapy Research

College of William & Mary, P.O. Box 8795, Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795, USA

Received 18 June 2014; Revised 15 September 2014; Accepted 15 October 2014; Published 6 November 2014

Academic Editor: Christine M. Blasey

Copyright © 2014 Glenn Shean. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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