Table of Contents
Advances in Radiology
Volume 2015, Article ID 206405, 25 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/206405
Review Article

Evaluating pH in the Extracellular Tumor Microenvironment Using CEST MRI and Other Imaging Methods

1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
2Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
3Department of Medical Imaging, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA
4University of Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA

Received 22 October 2014; Revised 8 February 2015; Accepted 8 February 2015

Academic Editor: Orazio Schillaci

Copyright © 2015 Liu Qi Chen and Mark D. Pagel. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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