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Archaea
Volume 2012, Article ID 896727, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/896727
Research Article

Archaeol: An Indicator of Methanogenesis in Water-Saturated Soils

1Organic Geochemistry Unit, Bristol Biogeochemistry Research Centre and The Cabot Institute, School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Cantock’s Close, Bristol BS8 1TS, UK
2Bristol Biogeochemistry Research Centre and The Cabot Institute, School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen’s Road, Bristol BS8 1RJ, UK

Received 21 August 2012; Accepted 16 October 2012

Academic Editor: Michael Hoppert

Copyright © 2012 Katie L. H. Lim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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