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Archaea
Volume 2014, Article ID 374146, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/374146
Research Article

Unique Characteristics of the Pyrrolysine System in the 7th Order of Methanogens: Implications for the Evolution of a Genetic Code Expansion Cassette

11EA-4678 CIDAM, Clermont Université, Université d’Auvergne, Place Henri Dunant, 63001 Clermont-Ferrand, France
2Department of Microbiology and Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, University College Cork, Western Road, Cork, Ireland
3Institut Pasteur, Department of Microbiology, Unité de Biologie Moléculaire du Gène chez les Extrêmophiles, 28 rue du Dr. Roux, 75015 Paris, France

Received 30 August 2013; Accepted 19 October 2013; Published 27 January 2014

Academic Editor: Kyung Mo Kim

Copyright © 2014 Guillaume Borrel et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Pyrrolysine (Pyl), the 22nd proteogenic amino acid, was restricted until recently to few organisms. Its translational use necessitates the presence of enzymes for synthesizing it from lysine, a dedicated amber stop codon suppressor tRNA, and a specific amino-acyl tRNA synthetase. The three genomes of the recently proposed Thermoplasmata-related 7th order of methanogens contain the complete genetic set for Pyl synthesis and its translational use. Here, we have analyzed the genomic features of the Pyl-coding system in these three genomes with those previously known from Bacteria and Archaea and analyzed the phylogeny of each component. This shows unique peculiarities, notably an amber    with an imperfect anticodon stem and a shortened synthetase. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that a Pyl-coding system was present in the ancestor of the seventh order of methanogens and appears more closely related to Bacteria than to Methanosarcinaceae, suggesting the involvement of lateral gene transfer in the spreading of pyrrolysine between the two prokaryotic domains. We propose that the Pyl-coding system likely emerged once in Archaea, in a hydrogenotrophic and methanol-H2-dependent methylotrophic methanogen. The close relationship between methanogenesis and the Pyl system provides a possible example of expansion of a still evolving genetic code, shaped by metabolic requirements.